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Jungle survival- traps and food- Final

My hammock setup is my only real refuge

Into the 4th day, this jungle survival course in Gombak was really wearing me down. This is probably the tip of an iceberg in terms of how a real person woul be feeling in a real jungle survival. And here, I am surrounded with friends but if it is about me being alone, I think I would really stress out.
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Honey harvesting by the Orang Asal of Perak- Part II

Men climbing up the Tualang tree

Our visit to Chuweh village was also to see first hand how the Orang Asal villagers harvest honey from the Tualang tree. On the second day there, with Sox coming along we took a boat ride to a location which is quite a distance from the village. The majestic Tualang tree is a sight to behold.

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Other things to carry in the jungle- Final Part

My kind of food!

I always carry a minimum of 3 liters of water with me when I hit the jungle. Doesn’t matter if it is just a day trip, I drink loads. As for food, I usually buy something like nasi lemak, cake (‘kuih’) and tapau into the jungle. Other food stuff already in the minimum kit are a few sachets of drinks and soups.
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Curious about the traditional bamboo blowpipes of the Orang Asli

The container, all natural material that keeps the darts safe

It was time to satisfy my curiosity with traditional blowpipes made by Orang Asal (a.k.a Orang Asli) using bamboo. As far as I know, traditional blowpipes are either made of solid wood or using a special bamboo. With a few friends, we swung by an OA village in Pahang and literally begged to have a closer look at this hunting tool.

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Ekop bamboo trap for squirell used in Borneo

This is a video I made of a trap called Ekop. This particular trap is still being used by the Bidayuhs in Semban, Sarawak. Made of bamboo, it has a very clever trigger mechanism. Locals usually set the trap across a walking path, making it look like a natural fallen piece of bamboo that a squirrel can use to go over. Enjoy!

Tilong, the Bidayuh rat – squirrel trap made of bamboo

Glen, a local Semban explaining the use of Tilong

Stored on the roof of a hut on a farm in Semban are a pile of traps I have not seen before. It was my second visit to Semban village in Sarawak and local Semban guide Glen explains to me how Tilong, a trap made of bamboo is used for small game like jungle rats and squirrel. Best of all, this bamboo trap is a stand alone unit and lasts for a long time!

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Jungle trap markers by Orang Asal in Perak

Spot the trap marker

Every wondered how jungle traps, when set are marked to warn others? There are a few Orang Asal villages I have visited that still uses traps as means to hunt game. While some traps like snares are less harmful to human beings, there are other traps that inflicts some serious injuries. In order to mark and warn others about the trap, some of the Semais in Perak fashions a ‘pointy marker’ to do the job.

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Beautiful Orang Asal homes in Perak

Hand woven attap made of palm fronds

There are some really beautiful and almost undiscovered Orang Asal homes in Perak. Good friend Jan invited me for an exploration trip to a region around near Ipoh to look for a waterfall. I skipped work and went with Jan. It was all worth it. Not only did Jan found his waterfall, but I too was equally amazed with the beauty of the people and the jungle there.

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Old tools of the Bidayuh in Semban; Part VIII

The fibers from Ijok palm tree has been used as cordage for generations and is still being used today

Some of the old tools that belong to the Bidayuh villagers in Semban are so old; they date back generations to the time of Rajah Brooke. During our visit there, we got to see traditional Bidayuh sugarcane crusher, old hunting weapons, hand powered forge and even an old rifle.

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Another traditional fire piston, Endau Rompin, Johor Malaysia; Part I

Tok Ali’s fire piston, handed through generations

Saya pernah ajar dia orang sekali, lepas tu dia orang try buat sendiri, tak jadi!’ This was what Tok Ali said to me, referring to the attempts by some tourist guides who tried to demonstrate the use of fire pistons after just one lesson from him. Tok Ali then came and sat with us, holding with him a plastic bag that contains his fire piston.

Continue reading Another traditional fire piston, Endau Rompin, Johor Malaysia; Part I